Blocking and shadow

A bit of work-in-progress this time.
I recently did a few workshops with Joby Carter – of vintage steam fair fame – looking at fairground lettering and sign writing. One of the fonts he taught was Playbill, and old-school font popular on the bills that were handed out advertising plays. It is reminiscent of cowboys and the wild west.

I’m working on a book cover and thought this would be an appropriate style. So this is it so far. Ink with graphite shading. The word ‘shadows’ is shown but, when complete, the title will be ‘Book of Shadows’.

On a technical note ‘blocking’ is the part of the design that gives the letters depth or thickness, ‘shadow’ is what is cast by a theoretical light source. Let me know what you think.

New shop

This is the new Dan Rox shop in Tiverton, Devon.
A new venture for Dan and Adam selling crystals and rocks, running workshops on all aspects of working with crystals, and having guest presenters along to join in the fun.
And they had a personal anniversary, too!

Poetry revisited

In December 2020 I was pleased and proud to have been chosen to illustrate a book of humorous poetry, written by Dianne Phillips-Zito. At the time I didn’t reveal any of the cartoons inside, but it seems like an opportune moment to do so now. Just a taster – you’ll have to buy the book to see the others. It is available on Amazon.

The first one shows two old ladies in a care home arguing over something. Could it be the attentions of the old feller watching … or something else?

Next, this lady is cleaning the oven while a picture of her old man smiles down. He looks full of himself. What is going on?

This bloke seems to be making his escape across the outback in an old jalopy . Who’s he on the run from?

The things we do for love. Wet suits are not the most flattering outfits!

Wiltshire Wonder

Another commission for Christmas, that has had to wait until now to be revealed. A lovely thatched cottage in Wiltshire.

Contact me if you want to give a special gift, or to treat yourself to something unique.

At home in Wales

When a caricature is commissioned I will not post it to the public domain until it is in the hands of its new owner, and the commissioner has given the go-ahead for me to do so. This means that on the run-up to Christmas I have been productive but have no posts to show for it. But here is my first reveal of 2022, a house in south Wales.

Let me know what you think, and remember – a caricature is not just for Christmas …

Illustrations

Another project that has been a while coming to fruition is the illustrations for a book, a short story called ‘Winter’s Longest Sleep‘, a cruel tale set on Exmoor near the end of the 18th century.

The book is available from Amazon.

It is written by Kelia-Jane Hannaford, a pseudonym of Richard J. Small, who has ten previous titles to his name. Here are some of the illustrations: a remote Exmoor farm, the farriers forge, a cosy ingle-nook, and a writing desk, illuminated only by moonlight now the candle has been snuffed.

From Bad to Verse – revisited

Do you remember, back in December, I posted about Dianne Phillips-Zito’s book of light-hearted poetry, From Bad to Verse and that I supplied the illustrations? Well, here’s a bit more information for you – seeing as that certain time of the year is approaching and you will be needing ideas for presents.

It is available from Amazon (like most things) and is an ideal stocking filler – From Bad to Verse by Dianne Phillips-Zito

These are some of my favourite illustrations from her book:

This poem is about domestic disputes in care homes, and how sometimes a little mis-communication goes a long way.

Things don’t always go to plan – well, not the plan that the boss had. But sometimes you have to wait for the right moment.

And the things we do – or don’t – for love.

The Railway Inn

Around 1830 the railway arrived in Gosport. It was a special line for the convenience of Her Majesty Queen Victoria who had a house on the Isle of Wight, Osborn House, to which she was inclined to visit on occasion, so a train from London direct to Gosport, for onward travel by ferry, was most advantageous.

Also quite handy for others in the area, whether frequenting the railway station, or just in need of refreshment, was The Railway Inn. It was built around 1830 and is of traditional design for the period. Sadly, or not, the licenced trade has not faired well in recent years, and in 2010 it closed and the building was sold.

It has been beautifully converted to a spacious dwelling, retaining many of the original features, and is now grade ll listed, in an area steeped in the history of the Royal Navy.

This was commissioned as a new home gift for the new owners – let’s hope it still has a well stocked bar.

The picture framed, and just about to be boxed

Town House

What better gift for a birthday or anniversary present than a unique drawing of your house. Or how about a gift for yourself just because you can.

This is a lovely town house, somewhere north of London and includes a personal memory.